Deal Me In – Week 44 Wrap Up

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There are so few unread stories remaining in our DMI 2014 rosters that some of the “surprise” from the luck of the draw is fading. I mean, you know “it’s going to be one of these” and you wonder which one – as opposed to earlier in the year, when – if you’re like me – you’d already forgotten you’d even added some of the stories you drew. Please, someone, make me feel better and tell me I wasn’t the only one that happened to. 🙂

New posts this week:

We saw, appropriately :-), “the return” of Returning Reader, who posted about three stories, Alain Mabanckou’sThe Fugitivehttp://returningreader.wordpress.com/2014/10/31/short-story-27-the-fugitive-alain-mabanckou/ Doreen Baingana’s “Passionhttp://returningreader.wordpress.com/2014/10/31/short-story-28-passion-doreen-baingana/ and Katherine Mansfield’s “The Strangerhttp://returningreader.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/short-story-29-the-stranger-katherine-mansfield/

Katherine read magician David Copperfield’s story “Snow” http://katenread.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/deal-me-in-week-44-snow/

Randall posted about William Faulkner’s “An Odor of Verbena” http://timeenuf.blogspot.com/2014/11/an-odor-of-verbena-by-william-faulkner.html

I wrote about Edina Doci’s “Bear Dancehttps://bibliophilica.wordpress.com/2014/11/02/bear-dance-by-edina-doci-a-good-story-born-from-a-great-idea/

Dale drew the five of spades and was led to Ray Bradbury’s “Yes, We’ll Gather at the River” http://mirrorwithclouds.wordpress.com/2014/10/30/ray-bradbury-yes-well-gather-at-the-river/

That’s what the DMI crew read this week. What short stories have you discovered lately? Some of us are already pondering what to put on our short story reading list for 2015 and may be willing to be guided…

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1 Comment

  1. November 3, 2014 at 3:27 pm

    That’s why I chose the name – I drop off the reading wagon every so often, but I keep returning…
    I’m looking at some collections of Irish short stories for inclusion in another possible future challenge. The short story genre has been very important in Irish literature, both in Irish and in English. I’m looking at Sheridan Le Fanu, Liam O’Flaherty, William Trevor and Clare Boylan, for a wide variety of styles.

    Like


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